Constable Court Services
(888) 364-7774 or (678) 412-0275

info@constablecourtservices.com

GEORGIA

PROCESS SERVERS

georgia service of process

GEORGIA PROCESS SERVERS
I you need a Process Serer in your city or county, our process servers are available to serve your summons, supoena and all other court documents anywher in your state.
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GEORGIA PROCESS SERVERS

hire a process server in georgia

We see that you need to hire a Georgia process server, wait no longer! Click on the "Get Started" button below to started the process by completing the order form.

Getting Started

Complete the order form to hire a Process Server

Upload Documents

Or just upload your court documents.

Check Status

Check on the status of your court documents

georgia service of process fee schedule

Note: The Court of Juridiction dictates the amount of time or the life of the court documents. Some jurisdictions, like the District of Columbia  grant the process servers up to 180 days to serve a paper. We are an agency that follow the instructions of the court.

GEORGIA  


Serving court documents anywhere in Georgia

find a process server in...

65.00 to 150.00

3 attempts made with 5 7 days

60.00

Additional to standard cost, with 3 attempts, first attempt with in 48 hours

210.00

Total cost with 3 attempts, first attempt made same day.

QUALITY OF SERVICES

Constable Staff SecretaryBy Hiring Our Trained Process Servers Online You Get Fast And Easy Delivery Of Your Affidavits, Subpoena, Or Summons

With our commitment to excellence and cost-effectiveness, Georgia Court Process Servers strive to provide the highest level of service at competitive rates. When you choose our professional process servers in Georgia, you can trust that your legal documents are in capable hands, ensuring a smooth and successful process. 

PROCESS SERVINGUse Our Highly Trained & Experienced Professional Process Servers For The Best Service of Process

Our Georgia Process Servers are a national process serving company under Constable Court Services that has a 96% success rate with executing service of process within Georgia. This task making us the premier choice for serving documents nationwide. Note: Weather effects the mission with service of process in Georgia.

Hire A Maryland Process Server Near Me With The Best Buy And Easy Process To Get You Started Today.

Our affordable process servers in Maryland are your greatest investment because we pride ourselves on providing exceptional service that offers the best buy for your money. We understand the importance of efficient and reliable delivery of legal documents, and our expert process servers in Maryland  are dedicated to ensuring that every document is served accurately and promptly.  

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Frequently Asked Questions

A process server delivers legal documents to individuals involved in court cases, ensuring proper notification of legal actions. They must follow legal procedures to confirm receipt, which is crucial for maintaining the legal process and ensuring defendants have a fair chance to respond.

In Georgia, process servers must adhere to specific rules and regulations to ensure that legal documents are served correctly and in accordance with the law. Here are the key rules for process servers in Georgia:

1. Who Can Serve Process:

  • Sheriffs and Deputies: Process can be served by the sheriff or a deputy within their jurisdiction.
  • Certified Process Servers: Individuals who are not sheriffs or deputies must be certified by the Judicial Council of Georgia to serve process.
  • Uncertified Individuals: In certain cases, individuals over 18 who are not involved in the case may be appointed by the court to serve process.

2. Certification Requirements:

  • Training: Certified process servers must complete a training program approved by the Judicial Council of Georgia.
  • Background Check: Applicants must undergo a background check.
  • Application: Process servers must submit an application and pay the required fee to become certified.

3. Methods of Service:

  • Personal Service: Delivering documents directly to the person to be served.
  • Substituted Service: Leaving documents at the person’s residence with someone of suitable age and discretion if the person to be served is not available.
  • Service by Publication: In certain cases, if the person cannot be located, service may be made by publishing a notice in a legal newspaper.

4. Proof of Service:

  • Affidavit of Service: After serving the documents, the process server must complete and file an affidavit of service with the court, detailing how, when, and where the documents were served.
  • Return of Service: The original summons must be returned to the court with proof of service attached.

5. Restrictions:

  • Time Restrictions: Service is generally not permitted on Sundays or legal holidays unless specifically authorized by the court.
  • Trespassing: Process servers cannot trespass on private property. They must respect no-trespassing signs and other indications of restricted access.

6. Ethical Conduct:

  • Professionalism: Process servers must conduct themselves professionally and avoid any actions that could be construed as harassment or intimidation.
  • Accuracy: All information in the affidavit of service must be accurate and truthful.

7. Additional Rules:

  • Serving Corporations: Service on a corporation can be made by delivering documents to an officer, managing agent, or registered agent of the corporation.
  • Serving Government Entities: Specific rules apply to serving government entities, such as delivering documents to the appropriate legal representative or official.

For detailed and specific requirements, it is recommended to consult the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (OCGA) and the Georgia Judicial Council’s guidelines. Additionally, local court rules may impose further requirements or restrictions.

In Georgia, the general rule for serving process is that the documents must be delivered directly to the individual to be served or, under certain circumstances, to someone of suitable age and discretion at the individual’s residence. Simply leaving papers at the door does not typically satisfy the legal requirements for service of process.

Here are the key points regarding leaving papers at the door in Georgia:

1. Personal Service:

  • Direct Delivery: The process server must hand the documents directly to the person being served.
  • Substitute Service: If the individual is not available, the documents can be left with a person of suitable age and discretion who resides at the individual’s usual place of abode.

2. Leaving Papers at the Door:

  • Not Sufficient: Leaving documents at the door is generally not sufficient for personal service under Georgia law. The process server must either deliver the papers to the person being served or leave them with a responsible person at the residence.

3. Alternative Methods:

  • Court Order: If personal service is not possible despite diligent efforts, the court may authorize alternative methods of service, such as service by mail or publication. This requires a court order and is typically used in situations where the individual is evading service or cannot be located.

4. Affidavit of Service:

  • Details Required: The process server must provide a detailed affidavit of service, specifying how, when, and where the service was made. If the service was not direct, the affidavit must include information about the person who received the documents.

5. Corporations and Entities:

  • Registered Agent: For serving a corporation or other business entity, documents can be delivered to the registered agent or an officer of the corporation. Simply leaving documents at the business premises is not sufficient unless the person receiving them is authorized to accept service.

6. Service by Publication:

  • Last Resort: If all other methods fail, and with the court’s permission, service by publication in a legal newspaper may be used. This method is typically a last resort.

To ensure proper service, it is important for process servers to follow the specific legal requirements outlined in the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (OCGA). Improper service can result in delays and may necessitate re-serving the documents.

 
 
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In Georgia, process servers typically do not leave messages as part of their official duties. Their primary responsibility is to deliver legal documents directly to the individual being served or, in certain circumstances, to someone of suitable age and discretion at the individual’s residence. Here are some key points regarding the leaving of messages by process servers:

1. Direct Service:

  • Personal Delivery: Process servers are expected to hand the documents directly to the person being served.
  • Substitute Service: If the individual is not available, documents can be left with a responsible person at the residence, but not simply left unattended or with a note.

2. Leaving Messages:

  • Not a Standard Practice: Leaving a voice message, text message, or written note is not considered valid service of process under Georgia law. The documents must be physically handed over to the person or a suitable substitute.
  • Notification: Process servers may attempt to notify the individual that they have documents to deliver, but this notification does not constitute proper service.

3. Affidavit of Service:

  • Documentation: Process servers must complete an affidavit of service, detailing how and when the service was accomplished. If they leave a message or note, this would typically be included in their notes for personal records but not as part of the formal affidavit of service since it does not constitute valid service.

4. Alternative Methods of Service:

  • Court-Ordered Methods: If personal service is not possible, the court may authorize alternative methods, such as service by mail or publication. These methods require a court order and documentation of the process server’s efforts to serve the documents.

5. Attempting Service:

  • Multiple Attempts: Process servers often make multiple attempts at different times of the day to catch the individual at home or work.
  • Record Keeping: They keep detailed records of each attempt, which can be useful if the court needs to authorize alternative service methods.

6. Legal Obligations:

  • Adherence to Rules: Process servers must adhere to the rules and regulations set forth in the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (OCGA) to ensure that the service is legally valid.

If you are expecting to be served with legal documents or are trying to ensure proper service, it is important to understand that messages or notes left by a process server do not fulfill the legal requirements for service of process in Georgia.

In Georgia, process servers typically do not leave messages as part of their official duties. Their primary responsibility is to deliver legal documents directly to the individual being served or, in certain circumstances, to someone of suitable age and discretion at the individual’s residence. Here are some key points regarding the leaving of messages by process servers:

1. Direct Service:

  • Personal Delivery: Process servers are expected to hand the documents directly to the person being served.
  • Substitute Service: If the individual is not available, documents can be left with a responsible person at the residence, but not simply left unattended or with a note.

2. Leaving Messages:

  • Not a Standard Practice: Leaving a voice message, text message, or written note is not considered valid service of process under Georgia law. The documents must be physically handed over to the person or a suitable substitute.
  • Notification: Process servers may attempt to notify the individual that they have documents to deliver, but this notification does not constitute proper service.

3. Affidavit of Service:

  • Documentation: Process servers must complete an affidavit of service, detailing how and when the service was accomplished. If they leave a message or note, this would typically be included in their notes for personal records but not as part of the formal affidavit of service since it does not constitute valid service.

4. Alternative Methods of Service:

  • Court-Ordered Methods: If personal service is not possible, the court may authorize alternative methods, such as service by mail or publication. These methods require a court order and documentation of the process server’s efforts to serve the documents.

5. Attempting Service:

  • Multiple Attempts: Process servers often make multiple attempts at different times of the day to catch the individual at home or work.
  • Record Keeping: They keep detailed records of each attempt, which can be useful if the court needs to authorize alternative service methods.

6. Legal Obligations:

  • Adherence to Rules: Process servers must adhere to the rules and regulations set forth in the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (OCGA) to ensure that the service is legally valid.

If you are expecting to be served with legal documents or are trying to ensure proper service, it is important to understand that messages or notes left by a process server do not fulfill the legal requirements for service of process in Georgia.

responsible for helping to collect over
Dept of Justice - Opioid Litigation
0 Billion

dispatching over

Court Documents Year 2023
0
1st nationwide process service
Legal Services
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LEARN HOW TO GET MORE OUT OF YOUR PROCESS SERVER

DID YOU KNOW

Process 1

Prepare the Documents: Ensure that all legal documents are properly prepared and contain the necessary information, including the recipient's name and address, details of the case, and the purpose of the service.

Process 2

Identify the Recipient's Location: Accurately determine the location of the person or party to be served, making sure you have the correct address or contact information.

Process 3

Choose a Qualified Process Server: Select a qualified and experienced process server who is knowledgeable about the legal requirements in your jurisdiction. per your preference.

Process 4

Serve the Documents: The process server personally delivers the legal documents to the recipient, ensuring that they understand the significance of the documents.

process 5

Complete Proof of Service: After service, the process server fills out and signs a proof of service or affidavit of service form, detailing how and when the documents were served.

Process 6

File the Proof of Service: The proof of service is filed with the court to officially record that service was completed. This document is essential for the legal proceedings to move forward.

When doing business with Constable Court Services your documents go through a very rigourious 6 step process before your documents are filed with the court and returned to you?

popular cities in georgia covered by our service of process

Click On a Process Server Near Me

  • Atlanta
  • Savannah
  • Columbus
  • Macon
  • Athens
  • Marietta
  • Alpharetta
  • Roswell
  • Duluth
  • Decatur
  • Gainesville
  • Albany
  • Valdosta
  • Warner
  • Rome
  • Newnan
  • Suwantee
  • Kennessaw
  • Douglasville
  • Douglasville
  • Carrolltown
  • Hinesville
  • Johns Creek
  • Statesboro
  • Griffin
ConSTABLE cOURT sERVICES

GEORGIA OFFICE

Atlanta, GA 30309
Phone: (888) 364-7774
Fax: (888) 529-0410
info@constablecourtservices.com

Process servers play a vital role in the legal system by ensuring that individuals receive legal notice and have the opportunity to respond to legal actions. If you are involved in a legal case and need to serve documents, it’s essential to hire a professional and experienced process server to ensure that the service is conducted accurately and in compliance with legal requirements.

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